The Poche Centre to host 3D total-body imaging system as part of world-first initiative to save lives from melanoma

The Poche Centre to host 3D total-body imaging system as part of world-first initiative to save lives from melanoma

29 November 2018

Melanoma Institute Australia (MIA) is proud to play a vital role in the Australian Cancer Research Foundation (ACRF) Australian Centre of Excellence in Melanoma Imaging and Diagnosis (ACEMID).

Fifteen 3D total-body imaging systems will be rolled out across Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria with the aim of improving detection of early-stage melanoma and saving lives. MIA’s The Poche Centre will host one of the 3D systems.

It is estimated each 3D imaging machine will be able to provide 3,000 examinations each year, resulting in a total of approximately 100,000 digital ‘avatars’ within three years. This will create a world-wide data set of skin images which will inform clinical studies that will ultimately lead to changes in clinical decision making. 

Funded by a highly competitive and prestigious $10 million grant from the ACRF, ACEMID is led by the University of Queensland, along with The University of Sydney and Monash University. It brings together three established NHMRC Centres of Research Excellence (CRE), including the CRE in Melanoma in which MIA leads, to combine cutting-edge imaging technology with a remote medicine network. Melanoma Institute Australia’s team members critical to the initiative include Professor Graham Mann, who is the NSW Chief Investigator (CI), and MIA Co-Medical Director Professor Richard Scolyer and Associate Professor Pascale Guitera who are experts in Diagnostic Intelligence. MIA’s Professor Andrew Spillane and Associate Professor Robyn Saw are Associate Investigators and Associate Professor Anne Cust and Associate Professor Rachael Morton feature in Clinical and Health Service Evaluation roles.

Co-Medical Director of MIA, Professor Richard Scolyer, said the initiative would provide enhanced access to specialist services for patients in rural and remote areas.  

‘This infrastructure will provide the foundation for 3D total body imaging to be implemented within a remote medicine network, which is essential in a country as vast as Australia,’ Professor Scolyer said.

‘Three dimensional total body data will be transmitted from 3D imaging systems in geographically diverse locations to centralised image storage repositories, which will enable dermatologists and other skin specialists to review patient images. This will have immense impacts on patients by ensuring they are diagnosed quickly, early and accurately, regardless of where they live.’

The ACRF Australian Centre of Excellence in Melanoma Imaging and Diagnosis is a world first approach to tackling the burden of melanoma, and aims to achieve a “World Without Melanoma”. It will create a multi-disciplinary, multi-site team with the goal of improving the detection and diagnosis of melanoma whilst reducing variability in diagnosis and the incidence of thicker, poorer prognosis melanomas. The initiative also aims to reduce the financial burden of melanoma on the Australian public, decrease consultation times by taking a total-body image in milliseconds, and improve the health equity of rural and remote Australians in regards to melanoma diagnosis.

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